Healthy Recreation Durham Newsletter Fall/Winter 2014/15 Header

Welcome to the Healthy Recreation Durham E-Newsletter –
Fall/Winter 2014/15

There are two sections for you to enjoy. The first is for coaches and has information geared to you. The second is for participants and parents and has information for you to share. You can do this by printing it off, forwarding, copying and pasting, or clicking the link provided for stand-alone articles. You can also add a link to the e-newsletter on your organization’s website. 

Please let us know how you're sharing this resource!

For Coaches
For Recreation Participants and Parents



Coaches and recreation leaders


Apple that looks like a basketball

Help your team win with healthy eating

Coaches have a great opportunity to promote healthy eating behaviours among their athletes.
Click here to read more.




 

boy with ball in the autumn
Physical literacy – building blocks toward a healthy active future!

As a coach, you can help children develop physical literacy skills that will support them to be physically active throughout their life. 
Click here to read more.



 

Coach encouraging players
Coaches can help build resilient teens!

Coaches, the role you play both during and after the game impacts your players. Having a positive adult role model helps protect a teen’s mental health and builds their resiliency.
Click here to read more.



 

Hockey player sitting on sidelines
Sitting on the sidelines?

Did you know, in many sports, your players may spend one third of their time being sedentary?
Click here to read more.




 

Football player
Signs to look for if you think an athlete has suffered a concussion

If an athlete suffers a bump or blow to the head during play, some of these signs may be seen in the athlete.
Click here to read more.



 

Play Live Be Tobacco Free logo
There is no safe level of exposure to second-hand smoke

85% of Durham Region residents support smoke-free sports fields and spectator areas.  Many sports organizations in Durham Region have adopted smoke-free/tobacco-free policies.  
Click here to read more.




Please let us know how you're sharing this resource!

 Recreation participants and parents

Woman surveying fruit and vegetable choicesEating healthy on the run

By offering healthy food choices, players can play at their best!  With the rush between after school and games or practices, it can be a challenge to have nutritious meals. Click here for quick recipe ideas. Also find other quick recipes and free healthy eating resources at durham.ca/healthyeating.


 

Discover Your Inner Chef

Discover Your Inner Chef!

Need help making healthy meals on a budget so that your children are well nourished and ready to play?
Click here to read more (PDF).



 

Woman and teenage daughter
Parents can help build resilient teens

Parents, believe it or not, your teen listens to you. Seventy-five percent of teens say their parents influence the decisions they make. Having a positive adult role model helps protect a teen’s mental health and builds resiliency.
Click here to read more (PDF).  


 

Take Care... Take Cover with sun
Be sun safe this fall and winter

Are you and your family planning to participate in outdoor sporting events this fall and winter?  Did you know that as the weather begins to cool, ultraviolet rays can still penetrate clouds, mist and fog to cause harm such as sunburn, eye damage, wrinkles and skin cancer?
Click here to read more (PDF).

 

Mum and son hugging
You, your teen and alcohol

On your way to the game? Why not take a moment to talk to your teen about alcohol?
Click here to read more (PDF).  





Please let us know how you're sharing this resource!

swim team with healthy snack Help your team win with healthy eating

Coaches have a great opportunity to promote healthy eating behaviours among their athletes. When a coach role models and supports healthy eating they can provide their team with a winning game plan for their health.  Even small changes over time can make a big difference in children’s eating habits. Healthy eating can also help your team to have the energy they need to play at their best! 
For ideas and resources to assist you in promoting healthy eating to your team click here to download a copy of the Healthy Eating Playbook for Coaches! 


 

Physical literacy – building blocks toward a healthy active future!

As a coach, you can help children develop physical literacy skills that will support them to be physically active throughout their life.

What is physical literacy?

Physical literacy skills are the basic movement skills that enable children to play sports and games.  Children begin to learn these skills in their early years and build on them as they grow.  Having the basic skills such as being able to throw, catch, run, and jump are needed to play many types of sports or other active games. It means having the confidence to try new activities. These skills play a big part in how a person’s health develops and set the stage for a healthy active future.
Child playing basketballChildren and youth who are physically literate are more likely to grow up to:
  • have the basic physical knowledge, skills and attitudes to lead healthy active lives
  • take part in more sports and be active in their leisure time
  • choose healthy lifestyles and be less sedentary
Children who are physically literate are more likely to meet the Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines of at least 60 minutes of physical activity every day.

What can you do?

As coaches, you have a chance to help create healthy active lives now and for the future by assisting children to become physically literate.  You can help children learn some of the basic movement skills.  Tailoring practices and exercises to develop the movement skills needed to play your sport will help build on children’s physical literacy.

Learn more about physical literacy, physical activity and access some helpful resources at durham.ca/physicalactivity.

 Coaches can help build resilient teens

Coaches, the role you play both during and after the game impacts your players. Having a positive adult role model helps protect a teen’s mental health and builds their resiliency.
Resiliency is the ability to handle life’s ups and downs in positive ways. Teens often feel stressed as they go through the big physical, emotional and social changes of adolescence. Building a teen’s resiliency can help them cope better.
To become more resilient, teens need:
pile of shoes

Supportive relationships
Healthy coping
Optimistic thinking
Emotional awareness
Skills for living

Tips:
  • Get to know your players.
  • Be firm, fair and flexible.
  • Make healthy eating a part of your game plan.
  • Talk with your players about the benefits of sleep.
  • Develop a team code of conduct at the beginning of the season.
  • Encourage your team to give back to the community (e.g. toy drive, coaching younger players).
  • Laugh and have fun, don’t take the game too seriously.
  • Role model the positive behaviours you want to see in your players.
  • Explore positive ways to help your teen players manage their intense feelings.
  • Host parent/guardian meetings to discuss team goals and code of conduct for all.
  • No matter if they win or lose, be your team’s cheering section and their biggest fan.
Being involved in sports can have great physical and mental health benefits for teens. Many of these will last a lifetime. 

Sitting on the sidelines?

Lineup of kids playing hockey sitting on the bench
Did you know, in many sports, your players may spend one third of their time being sedentary? For example, kids on a hockey team spend about one third of the game sitting on the bench.  In the average soccer game, only one quarter of the team will get a full 60 minutes of physical activity.  It is important for all players to minimize long periods of sitting.  

Sedentary time is any time spent with very little movement, most often sitting. Spending too much time sitting can take years off your life and put your health at risk.  
 
As a coach, you can encourage your players to stand up, move and stretch instead of sitting for long periods on the bench or sidelines. Ensure that all team members are given plenty of play time during games and practices. Check out more information on sedentary time.

Signs to look for if you think an athlete has suffered a concussion

If an athlete suffers a bump or blow to the head during play, some of these signs may be seen in the athlete. They may:
  • appear dazed or stunnedFootball player
  • be confused
  • forget an instruction
  • be clumsy upon movement
  • answer questions slowly
  • lose consciousness (even briefly)
  • show mood, behaviour or personality changes 
The athlete may complain of:
  • headache or “pressure” in their head
  • nausea or vomiting
  • balance problems or dizziness
  • double or blurry vision
  • sensitivity to light
  • sensitivity to noise
  • feeling sluggish, hazy, foggy or groggy
  • concentration or memory problems

What should you do if you think an athlete has a concussion?

  • Seek medical attention right away - the athlete needs to be taken to a doctor to be assessed for a concussion.
  • The athlete should be kept out of sports.
  • The athlete needs to be removed from the sport/game right away.
  • The athlete needs to take some time to rest and recover.
  • The athlete should follow the ‘Return to Play’ guidelines to avoid repeat concussions.
For more information on concussions and to access the ‘Return to Play’ guidelines go to www.durham.ca/sportsinjury.

There is no safe level of exposure to second-hand smoke

85% of Durham Region residents support smoke-free sports fields and spectator areas.  Many sports organizations in Durham Region have adopted smoke-free/tobacco-free policies. Tobacco-free sport and recreation means participants, spectators, coaches and leaders do not smoke, snuff, dip or chew tobacco while engaged in the activities of your organization.
 
Benefits of smoke-free outdoor sports and recreation include:Play, Live, Be, Tobacco-Free Logo
  • protecting children from second-hand smoke
  • preventing youth from starting to use tobacco
  • protecting the environment
  • creating a tobacco-free culture
  • helping those who are trying to quit smoking 
For more information, or to request a copy of the Tobacco-Free Sports and Recreation Toolkit, click here, or visit  durham.ca/tobacco. 

~Imagine smoke-free parks, playgrounds and sports fields~
 

For more information on keeping your team safe and healthy, contact Durham Health Connection Line at 905-666-6241 or 1-800-841-2729 or visit www.durham.ca/health.
 
If you are not already receiving the Healthy Recreation Durham E-Newsletter and would like to subscribe, or if you would like to unsubscribe from the newsletter, contact us.


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